A Government Shutdown Breakdown

The government has shutdown and continues, making this the longest government shutdown in history.

The Talon

The government has shutdown and continues, making this the longest government shutdown in history.

Tayla Martin , Staff Writer

President Donald Trump shut the government down on December 21, 2018, and the shutdown has continued into January 2019, making it the longest shutdown in U.S. history. The shutdown was set into place when Congress came to an impasse over “the Wall” that President Trump is trying to build on the border of Mexico and the United States.

The shutdown has been the cause of many negative effects in America. 380,000 non-critical and 420,000 critical government employees have lost their pay. Some of the employees are still going to work without pay. Congress passed a bill to reimburse federal employees for lost wages once the shutdown ends; however, contract workers won’t be reimbursed.

Government employees are not the only ones feeling the impact of this shutdown. Farmers are not able to get loans processed, March food stamps can be cut out, and  federal civil cases and immigration court cases are being delayed. “We will vote swiftly to reopen government and show that Democrats will govern responsibly in stark contrast to this chaotic White House,” stated Representative Nancy Pelosi while giving a statement on the thought of Democrat Party about the shutdown.

President Trump has said that he is willing to come to a compromise to end the government shutdown. The compromise states that he will allow “Dreamers,” young illegal immigrants, to come into the country and stay for another three years longer if the government will pay the $5.7bn for the wall. Congress has denied the compromise, so the shutdown will continue.